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. republican senator lindsey graham has revealed he says the death toll in u.s. drone war overseas. at a speech in south carolina wednesday night, he said -- his comments mark the first time a u.s. official has offered a figure for those killed in nearly a decade of u.s. drone strikes abroad. the 4700 figure matches the high end of an estimate by the bureau of investigative journalism, which extensively has covered the strikes. the news comes as the obama administration continues to stonewall members of congress on fully releasing the justice department memos explaining the legal rationale for targeted killings overseas. the white house agreed to a least partially disclose the memos earlier this month after a senate uproar amid the conformation hearings for cia nominee john brennan. but the new york times reports the administration has adopted a strategy of continuing to deny senators full access while simultaneously negotiating with republicans to reveal more information on the deadly u.s. consulate in benghazi, libya. the strategy appears focused on ensuring the white house has enough votes f
information first from the white house about events surrounding the fatal attack on u.s. diplomatic mission in benghazi, libya last september. this is republican senator john cornyn of texas. >> the majority leader knows full well the reason why the debate -- closing off debate was denied was because a reasonable request been made on the site for additional information. i hope and trust it will be provided here in the next few days. and when we come back from the recess, we will have another vote and another opportunity for senators to express themselves. but this is not any attempt to kill this nomination. this is not a filibuster. >> democrats are vowing to revive hagel's nomination following the recess next week. despite republican denials, senate -- bitter majority leader harry reid said the block or isn't it an historic filibuster. >> not a single nominee for secretary of defense ever in history of the country has been filibustered. >> chuck hagel is a former republican senator who is faced criticism for straying from the party line on iran and iraq war and making comments perceived as
his support for drones and the targeted killings of u.s. citizens. >> people that were standing up here today, i think they really have a misunderstanding of what we do as a government and the care we take, and the agony we go through to make sure we do not have any collateral injuries or deaths. >> 8 codepink protesters are arrested. we will speak with the group's founder who after returning from pakistan to protest drones, personally went to the house of john brennan, not on the door. he invited her in. we will find out what they talked about. you also speak with jeremy scahill, author of the forthcoming book and movied andirty wars," and melvin goodman, author of, "national insecurity: the cost of american militarism." all of that and more coming up. this is "democracy now!," democracynow.org, the war and peace report. i'm amy goodman. john brennan, president of and is picked to head the cia, defended the administration's controversial counterterrorism policies during his senate confirmation hearing thursday. he attempted to justify the administration's use of drone strikes, and
now!" >> i think it is a vital tool. i have been intimately involved with the condition u.s government has been involved in and i consider without a doubt it has been very successful as far as producing intelligence. >> as counter-terrorism czar john brennan heads to capitol today for his confirmation hearing to head the cia, we will look at his role in the government's secretive post-9/11 rendition program. we will speak with amrit sing, author of the new report, "globalizing torture: cia secret detention and extraordinary rendition." >> the american public needs to know what its government did. grabbing people off the street, flying them to secret cia prisons to be locked up, shut out, held in detention and subjected to interrogation, and many instances that amounted to torture. >> then radio ambulante and the power of radio. >> we begin at the world's busiest border crossing in tijuana. it is rush hour and a mass exodus into the u.s., each with a particular mission and a baggage to prove it. summer caring suitcases, others carrying school books. >> an spanish-language radio program
, the obama administration claims it has legal authority to assassinate u.s. citizens overseas even if there is no intelligence indicating they are engaged in an active plot to attack the u.s. we will speak with jameel jaffer from the aclu. the obama administration is claiming the legal authority to indefinitely detain americans without charge or trial. >> the way in which our fundamental rights, our bill of rights, our constitution freedoms have been abridged by the last 10 years and more as president obama is unhappily following in that tradition. >> we will speak with whistleblower daniel ellsberg who is in new york this week to attend an appeal in his lawsuit against the ndaa. we will speak with computer security researcher jacob appelbaum who lost a federal appeals court ruling that the government could subpoena his twitter and e-mail information without a warrant as part of its probe into wikileaks. the boy scouts of america prepared to vote on whether to lift its ban on gay members. >> the question always comes down to, can case raise quick -- raise kids? most people really d
to the streets across the country. bahrain is home to the u.s. navy's fifth fleet and a close u.s. ally in the region. we'll have more on the protests later in the broadcast. in the united states, nearly 50 people were arrested wednesday in front of the white house calling on president obama to reject the keystone xl pipeline. the pipeline would deliver tar sands oil from canada to refineries in texas. but critics who've joined a mounting campaign of civil disobedience say it will bring climate disaster. on tuesday, a group of protesters including leading scientists, activists and celebrities sat down and refused to move. some zip-tied themselves to a fence. those arrested included environmentalist bill mckibben, actress daryl hannah, and nasa climate scientist james hansen and former chair of the naacp julian bond. the protest was a landmark for the sierra club environmental group after its board endorsed an act of civil disobedience for the first time in its 120-year history. director michael brune was among those arrested. >> so we know we cannot win on climate change if we continue
brain cells rather lives, call saying the -- causing issues. it is important to use that research to understand how to read change sports for kids so we do not put them to the same trauma. >> had games. a senate superbowl approaches, we look at the growing links between concussions and brain damage. we will speak with former professional wrestler and college football player chris nowinski, now a leading crusader to make football and other sports safer. longtime revolutionary. >> [indiscernible] writing about the life we live without having it edited by the system. >> as we mark the beginning of black history month, a new documentary premieres today about imprisoned journalist mumia abu-jamal. he will join us from inside prison in pennsylvania. all of that and more coming up. this is "democracy now!," democracynow.org, the war and peace report. i'm amy goodman. in breaking news from turkey, at least two people have been killed in an apparent suicide bombing at the u.s. embassy in the capital of ankara. an official says the bomber set off an explosive device at the entrance to the d
. six weeks later, the u.s. attack. the wmd's were never found. today we'll speak with media analyst norman solomon and colorado lawrence wilkerson, "with liberty and justice for some: how the law is used to destroy equality and protect the powerful." 's former chief of staff. >> i have admitted to this a number of times publicly and privately, was the person who put together colin powell's presentation on february, five, 2003. probably the biggest mistake of my life. >> u.s. lawmakers are threatening to cut funding to brooklyn college, this will host a forum to mourn at about the palestinian led campaign to boycott and divest from israel. >> extreme radicals, as i said, basically what the state of israel to disappear from the face of the earth. i have a problem with that. they are sponsoring this event. they're supporting ms. event. that is the issue. that is absolutely outrageous. >> we will be joined by one of the speakers at the brooklyn college event, omar barghouti. also, glenn greenwald. another campaign, this went over climate change. students at over 200 campuses are pushing
address, john allen said the u.s. is winning the war in afghanistan. >> afghan forces defending afghan people and enabling the governments of this country to serve its citizens, this is victory. this is what winning looks like. we should not shrink from using these words. i've lived afghanistan will never again be a safe haven to terrorists -- i believe afghanistan will never again be a safe haven to terrorists and the scourge of the plague of the world. >> the obama administration plans to nominate alan to serve as the next supreme allied commander after he was cleared of misconduct in the scandal of the ousted david petraeus. israeli forces have dismantled a number -- another palestinian encampment challenging the settlement growth in the west bank. activists erected tents near have been saturday in a bid to protect their town. there were forcibly -- they were forcibly arrested. bahrain's government holding reconciliation talks about opposition parties for the first time in over a year. the negotiations last broke down in july 2011 after opposition groups accused the u.s.-backed mona
of life. those of us who work with babies are able to enjoy the rapid growth that occurs during the child's earliest years and form deep, affectionate bonds with each baby in our care-- bonds that we now know can impact a child for life. but sometimes, caring for infants and toddlers in a group setting can be demanding and difficult. how do we know when we are doing the right thing with our infants and toddlers? what if a baby won't stop crying? what if a toddler refuses to put on her jacket? and what about those magnificent temper tantrums for which 2-year-olds are so famous? hello. i'm joanne hendrick, the author of the whole child and your guide to this video series. in this program, we're going to look at some of the important components that go into providing consistent, one-on-one relationships with infants and toddlers in group settings. we'll observe some infant and toddler programs in private child-care centers, university lab schools, and family day-care homes, and we'll hear from infant and toddler teachers who offer practical advice for working with our youngest children. read
in the face of increased hostility from the u.s. all of that and more coming up. this is "democracy now!," democracynow.org, the war and peace report. i'm amy goodman. north korea is drawing global condemnation for a new underground nuclear test. the north korean government confirmed the test after seismic activity of 4.9 magnitude was picked up in the korean peninsula. north korea had vowed to conduct rocket launches and a u.s.-and declared test after the u.n. security council resolution tightened sanctions in response to rocket launch two months ago. in a statement, u.n. secretary general ban ki-moon condemned the test, calling it "deplorable" and "a clear and grave violation." the security council is holding an emergency session on north korea later today. two men have been charged in the shooting death of a 15-year-old girl struck by random gunfire just days after performing at president obama's inauguration. hadiya pendleton had recently returned from washington, where she performed with her school marching band during the inaugural festivities. she was laid to rest saturday at a f
against u.s. special operations forces that prompted afghan president karzai to order the removal from wardak province. afghan officials said they have received complaints for the past three months that u.s. forces have arrested nine people who have since disappeared. one afghan villagers said her son was taken away and later found dead. >> my son was taken in his body was dropped under a bridge in the river. one of his fingers was cut off. he was beaten very badly. his body was stolen from torture and his throat was slit. why is the government not listening to our voices? why are they not stopping americans from doing such things? while i wanted to stand to talk with the americans, they pulled me back and hit me in the chest with the but of a gun. i still feel pain here since i have been beaten. you can still see the marks on my chest. >> the afghan government is expected to form a commission of inquiry with the u.s.-led nato occupation force to investigate the allegations. on monday, a nato spokesperson said no evidence of wrongdoing has emerged so far. >> between all allegations of
they use. households in such simple economies are almost completely self-sufficient. at the other end of the spectrum are highly complex economies in which people specialize in one particular job, like these shoe salesmen in morocco. specialization means people are no longer self-sufficient, but depend on each other. the shoe salesmen are dependent on the shoemakers, and the shoemakers are dependent on the tanners, and so on. this dependence on others makes society in general more complex, so specialization is a measure of society's overall complexity. archaeologists find evidence of specialization everywhere -- in the buildings and sculpture of ancient cities, and in crafts like elegant jade earrings, decorated pottery and even skulls with jade inlays in their teeth. these craft items were all made by specialists who worked at the ancient maya city of copan. between a.d. 400 and 800, this magnificent city flourished as one of the major centers of maya art and culture. copan was built in a broad mountain valley on the western border of honduras. at its height, the economic system of t
on the group's role in the case. and we're joined by antony loewenstein, joining us from sydney, australia via videostream, an independent journalist and author, co- founder of independent australian jewish voices. let's begin with you. if you could start off by just lying out what this case is all about, who this man was. >> in short, this man's identity was not known until last week. we knew the case a few years ago when it was reported the man had committed suicide in the israeli jail and nothing else. last week on television the story was broken. what has essentially come out in the last week has been a litany of information which really goes to the heart of what regularly happens between australia and israel. on the one hand, what happened to ben zygier is unique. not that many austrian-israelis died in prison, that is true. but the facilitation by the establishment in the australian intelligence services of young jews here israel to live -- [indiscernible] it does not get talked about. the press does not examine it that often, but it is not unusual. because the heart in some ways what it
establishing an important precedent, an important step in itself. it will allow us to supply a greater range of equipment to help protect civilian life in syria, and will enable us to give assistance and advice we had been restricted in giving before. >> the new york times is reporting the obama administration may revisit the possibility of arming syrian rebels after obama initially rejected the idea last fall. syrian refugees fleeing conflict are continuing to flood into neighboring countries at a rate of thousands per day. a jordanian border official said monday nearly 90,000 syrians have crossed into jordan since the beginning of the year. one of those refugees decried the conditions in her home country. >> our homes are all destroyed. we have nothing. if bashar al-assad once our country, let him have it. we came here after running between homes, trying to avoid the fire that rained down on us. if it were not for the free syrian army protecting us, we would have died. god help us. >> in the u.s., georgia is set to put a man did that tonight despite consensus among medical specialists is m
. in a statement, karzai accused u.s. special forces of "harassing, annoying, torturing and even murdering innocent people." karzai aides say the allegations pertains to afghan forces operating under u.s. command. the ban will take effect in two weeks. the move comes days after nato members wrapped up a key summit on the future of the occupation of afghanistan after 2014. defense secretary leon panetta denied claims the u.s. plans to keep 8000-12,000 troops in afghanistan after its formal withdrawal 2014. panetta said this figures would comprise the total nato force, not just u.s. contingent. >> we want to be able to have the flexibility to look at a range of options that we ought to have for our enduring presence, but i want to make very clear that the range of options we were discussing was with regards to the nato force. the nato force consists of both the u.s. presence plus nato contributions. >> the obama administration has increased u.s. military deployment in the african country of niger to at least 100 soldiers. obama told congress on friday the troops would be deployed under a mission of i
. >> president obama uses his state of the union to urge congress to tackle gun-control. he will speak to kathy, and, in chicago professor and organizer organized a petition of hadiya pendleton. we will also speak to obama's climate change policies. >> i can announce over the next year another 34,000 american troops will come home from afghanistan. this drawdown will continue. by the end of next year, our war in afghanistan will be over. >> while obama says the war will be over next year, the pentagon says the troops will remain until the 2024. we will speak to activist kathy kelly. and we will speak to aura bogado about what he did not say about immigration. this is democracy now!, democracynow.org, the war and peace report. i'm amy goodman. president obama gave further details on his second term agenda tuesday night with the annual state of the union address. on the environment, obama called on lawmakers to take action against global warming with a number of victims of gun violence in attendance, obama also urged congress to vote on new gun control measures, including background checks and ba
as a society if we do nothing. i can predict what will be written of us 20, 30 years from now if we don't act. when i think about all of the courage to have shown, it is not too much as the political establishment in this country, democrats and republicans, state legislators, governors, to show some political courage, too. >> india has suffered its worst bombing after a series of blasts killed 16 people. the bombs were detonated close together in a crowded shopping area. dozens of people were wounded. officials there are reportedly probing whether a militant group is behind the attack. the government's recent execution of it and islamist militant is seen as a possible motive. the syrian capital of damascus has seen one of its bloodiest days in nearly two years of fighting between government forces and rebels seeking the ouster of president bashar al- assad. the death toll from a series of bomb blasts in the city thursday as risen to a least 83 people, most of them civilians. the syrian observatory for human rights said more than 60 of the victims died in a blast that apparently targeted the r
they're telling us. so i think we have to have young people growing up understanding the risks, not focusing a single risk, but also understanding the benefits. and we have to have a society which supports the correct choices. the reality is that many teenagers today are engaging in sex, many without protection of any type. robert hatcher: what that often is, is opportunity and excitement joining together, and where people decide we're going to do it when actually it would be wiser that night not to do it until they had their contraception lined up. half the pregnancies in the united states today are unwanted or unplanned and a fourth of all pregnancies in the united states today end up in elective abortion. i think that's a big problem. four in ten young women have at least one unintended pregnancy before the age of 20. it wasn't really expected but then again, you now, i wasn't really using any protection so i knew it was going to happen eventually. i didn't think i could have kids, so i didn't think it was going to happen to me. yeah, i was confused. i didn't know what i was
to understand that the urgency of our path is so here with us in the present -- past is still here with us in the present critic rex he spoke with us after was announced franklyn burke would not the boss frank lautenberg would not seek reelection. all of that and more coming up. this is democracy now!, democracynow.org, the war and peace report. i'm amy goodman. tens of thousands rallied on washington's national mall sunday for what organizers dubbed the largest climate rally in u.s. history. the "forward on climate" event urged the president to reject the keystone pipeline and commit the u.s. to binding limits on emissions of greenhouse gases. indigenous leaders chief jacqueline thomas and casey camp spoke. >> it puts at risk my neighbors to the east of me that live at the tarzans. the government does not recognize these people, and these people have been dying a mysterious cancers, their water is polluted, their animals are sick, and mother earth is sick. >> we're here to make a difference. we're here to be in solidarity with all of us to understand that we have a very slim opportunity t
are so good today. when most of us think of children with exceptional or special needs, the first thing that comes to mind is someone with obvious physical, emotional, or developmental handicaps or disabilities. catch the handles. good girl. whoop! whoa. there you go. go for it. hendrick: and in many cases, the needs of the children in our care will be apparent and obvious to us. turn. go to the door. but sometimes, difficulties take a while to show up. because we caregivers see children for such extended periods of time and we've known so many children, may be the first to recognize signs that a child may need more help and more support. notice how this teacher is observing and taking notes. it's very important for us to recognize learning challenge early, because early identification and proper intervention means that physical, emotional, or developmental conditions may be cleared up entirely, or at least the effect of the condition can be minimized. [humming] but nothing can be done, no individualized plan or program can even begin to be put into place, till the child is correctly id
, even though it's good for iron, if we eat too much of anything, it's not going to be good for us. so again, use logic in deciding how you handle your pregnancy. i needn't tell you, i needn't tell anybody that alcohol's not going to be good in pregnancy. i needn't tell anyone that using illicit drugs is not going to be healthy for your pregnancy. because ultimately that baby, if the mom uses regularly enough and in high enough quantity, the baby will become dependent on the drug in the same way that an adult would. in the wall of the lining of the uterus, there's a hormone that plays a very important role in the developing brain. so this is a signal from the mother that plays a role in how the baby's brain develops. so clearly speaking, we're talking about a drug, alcohol, that affects the mother's metabolism, where that signal doesn't get delivered to the fetus to allow normal brain development. in the last five to seven years, the rates have started to climb back up again in terms of women drinking while they're pregnant. it's the more highly educated, the more high income, typicall
capable of language, creativity, and thought. the differences among us lie in our cultures, our beliefs, how we organize our societies and how we make our living. humans have populated every environment on earth. we live on the frozen tundra and in the searing deserts. we live in thriving cities of millions and in isolated camps of a few dozen. some societies seem simple because they are small and their members are self-sufficient and use simple tools. others seem complex because they have large populations and people depend on each other for food and goods and use sophisticated technology. in between, there is a range that fills the spectrum. all of these differences are cultural, learned behavior, the result of a complex interaction between our inventiveness and our natural environments. as we search for new horizons, our inventiveness thrusts us across the boundaries of space, into new worlds. this new view of earth dispels an ancient myopia -- the artificial boundaries of our states and the politics that often divide us. here is a vision of one planet and one family of humankind. bu
claimed responsibility for the attack, calling it revenge for a recent u.s. drone strike. the violence comes after a monthly record for u.s. drone strikes inside pakistan in more than a year. at least 33 people were killed in iraq on sunday when suicide attackers bombay police station. france continues to fight in mali. french forces have launched a number of aerial attacks in a bid to secure control of the rubber -- rebel holdout of kidal. a top commander was arrested earlier today near the border with algeria. amnesty to national is calling for an independent probe of civilian deaths in mali. dai thanh mou to describe an event were civilians were killed without warning. >> we asked if there were any warnings to the civilians who were there. they told us there had been no warnings at all. we sent a letter to the defense minister and asked him to launch an independent, impartial inquiry regarding the deaths of those four people. >> and the state is also seeking out a probe of other incidents involving the ethnic groups linked to the arabs in the north. iran has expressed willingness to
. when someone takes advantage of a relationship by using force, or threatening to use force, it is abuse. - who is it? - it's my husband. the most common place for it to occur is in the home. david bennett: i think one of the things that is very hidden in our societies, certainly societies that have levels of outward violence, is violence within the family, directed at women and children. about one in three women is more likely to be abused in some form in her life domestically, by someone she loves or knows. and he kept hitting me in the face and punching me in the ribs... and i had a bloody nose and i was scared to death. we had this amazing 19-year-old girl come up the ramp into the clinic pushing one of those dual carriages with the twin boys in it. and she comes in, walks in the door and she says, "the premature baby clinic across the street sent me here. they said you might be able to help me." and she says, "he started beating me again." and the story unfolded that she had delivered these two little boys prematurely, because she had been severely beaten in pregnancy, a very common
these ancient families tell us about our own families ? around the world, archaeologists are looking far beyond the palaces and temples into the households of common people, bringing families to life out of the past. come forward all the way. oooh ! that's it. good. hold on me. come forward. ease the baby out with little pushes. come on. you can do it. beautiful ! the baby's coming up to you. waaahh ! keach: every newborn child immediately confronts three basic needs -- food, shelter and education. in the beginning, these needs are met at home. but in industrial societies, that soon changes. teacher: times three... we educate our children in schools. how would you read this number ? 21,000. you're getting these two a little mixed up from the example before. we earn our daily bread in offices, and we buy it in markets. but in many cultures, the household is still the most basic unit of society, where people spend most of their days, producing what they need to live and teaching their children their values and culture. anthropologist richard wilk. a household is an activity group. it's a group of
in the air. i mean, the air is around us, right? okay? it leaves behind a hole in the air. aha, but wait a minute, the scholars said, "you can't have a hole in the air, because nature abhors a vacuum." so that vacuum gonna be filled up by the air. so you're gonna squeeze down in back and squeeze it right along. and so there's the force. the air squeezes it along. saturday night when you're taking your bath, try ivory soap, the kind that floats. and you sit in the bathtub and there is a soap right there and you go to grab it. you've done it before and you go, "oh, i have it" it keeps going away from you, right? [laughter] you squeeze it right through the water. well, it was thought that cannonballs were squeezed similarly through the air and arrows too. what do you guys think about that? not too many people were satisfied with that, but that's the best they could do at the time. there gotta be some explanation. what's a better one? and along came an italian type by the name of galileo who turned it all upside down. everyone's looking for the force responsible for the motion, galileo said,
you find it? how could you not read the chapter and be astonished by that? i always used to think that the moon pulled harder on the oceans because it's closer, and the sun's so far away that the pull is a lot less. that's what i used to think, and then i get into my physics and boom, sometimes in physics you find things that are kind of like counterintuitive, don't they kind of say, hey, wait a minute, what's this, huh? and what's going on? it turns out that sun is far away, but honey, it is big. let me put it this way. you know the sun's hot and when you step from the shade into the sunlight, you can feel the heat of that sun, right? and you might say, wow, it feels-- i can feel the hotness because the sun has got such a high temperature, but you know what gang? i can bring you to welding shops wherein the welding, the torches of some of those flames are hotter than the surface of the sun, hotter, and you walk by that welding shop and you don't, whoa, go like that, but you step from the shade into the sunshine and whoa, you feel it. it's not that the sun has a high temperature.
, california may someday overtake the citrus capital of the u.s., florida, in production of them--all of which doesn't surprise farmers like craig kaprelian one bit. >> california has a much better climate to grow mandarins than does florida because they need a typically hot summer and a cold winter--hot to bring on the sugars, cold to bring on the colors. so, this is the best place in the rld to grow mandarins. >> craig, along with his marketing partner duda farms, harvests hundreds of thousands of petite-sized citrus a day in visalia. after harvest, they are carefully inspected, washed, and packed. anything that doesn't look absolutely perfect will go on to be used for juice or in citrus-scented products like candles and lotions. but one of the first things you need to get straight about these pocket-sized powerhouses is their names. you see, a tangerine and a clementine are both part of the mandarin orange family. and while each has different characteristics, all three are sweet, versatile, and are becoming the darlings of farmers who see the many marketing possibilities with them and as ch
that we can experience mental trouble in our life. some of the things that give us trouble, is how we're constituted. not what we have, but who we are, will influence how we feel in certain situations, and sometimes how we feel in certain situations becomes so distressed, we need help with it. and then finally, everyone knows and appreciates that you can have difficulty in life because of what's happened to you, what you've encountered. damage to the brain... the interplay of personality and environment... difficult life situations... all can contribute to mental distress. so can family history. andrew leuchter: if an individual has a first-degree relative, that is a father, mother, brother, sister, who suffers from bipolar disorder, manic depressive illness, or from depression, they are at significantly increased risk for having a mood disorder themselves. a mood disorder is an emotional state, that to some degree, interferes with social, familial, occupational functioning. the most common mood disorder throughout the world is depression. andrew leuchter: depression can strike anybod
, universal, you're right. universal, that gravity extends everywhere. and what this equation tells us? the equation of gravity just tells us that there's an attractive force, 'f' between all things and for any two things that attractive force depends upon, is proportional to, is related to the product of the masses of the two things. this might be a planet, one. this might be another planet, two. those two planets are tugging on each other with the force that depends very much on how much mass they have, but it also peters out with distance square. as the distance between those planets or those chunks of matter or those particles, as the distance between increases, guess what happens to the force? just what you would expect to happen. - larger or smaller? - smaller. how many say, "oh, it seems to me "as the planets get further and further away, they pull harder and harder on each other?" stand up, i wanna see what you look like. nobody say that. but you see, we can say that statement here mathematically by putting this downstairs, huh? as that make the distance big, what happens to th
feel good knowing that one of us is getting an a." wouldn't you feel that way? right? right? right? you say, "one of us made it, man." and you go home at night and you're flunking all your courses and you got a grin on your face and someone say, "how come you're grinning?" and you say, "'cause one of us is making it, one of us is making it." you know how it was back in the seventies when i gave that lady the a? the class asked me, "is she really getting an a?" "yes, she's getting an a." i said, "scout's honor." and someone, "she's really getting an a for that?" i said, "yes." and guess what they did? ooh, they didn't like it. one of their own. boom, am i glad to see we're developing. isn't that right, gang? [laughter] that's the old days. you know, this center of gravity has to do with a lot of things, like it has to do with, like, your body condition. let me give you-- let me show you what i mean. this is an ordinary woman. where's her center of gravity? right above her head. it's about right here. center of gravity. i mean, it's ol' mother earth pulling down as if all her weight were
. and those neutrinos are flooding the universe. and these neutrinos are going right through, guess who? us. you guys, not me, but, no, all of us. these neutrinos are going right through and right out the other side without making a hit. you know why? do you ever get the feeling some days that, you know, i just don't feel like i feel like i'm nothing? i'm nothing. i think i'm just nothing. do you ever get that feeling? guess what? i got news for you. you are nothing. compared to the something, there's more nothing, because the atoms that make you up are mostly-- talk about being spongy-- and we're all sponges, hon. and most--the little particles make up... take 133 million tons. that's several city blocks. scrunch all those atoms up, 133 million tons, scrunch them up until all these things here cave into one another. you got the size of a pea. so take the size of a pea and spread out a city block, that's how atoms are, most of them. so these things go right through our body without ever making a direct hit. you get, maybe, one direct hit per year on the average, one got me, okay? very, very
history of excavation "had such an amazing sight been seen "as the light of our torch revealed to us: "strange animals, statues, and gold. "everywhere the glint of gold. "we had seen enough. "we reclosed the hole, mounted our donkeys, "and rode home down the valley, strangely silent and subdued." brown: the discovery of tutankhamun's tomb in 1922 had an instantaneous and shattering effect on the world's imagination that continues to this very day. extraordinary numbers of visitors descended upon the tomb--sometimes to the point where the excavators were unable to function. egyptian motifs swept through the world of fashion and design. ashe whole worldthrilled t, death and the supernatural seemed to gin to prey upon the excavators. lord carnarvon died first--from the bite of a mere mosquito. as death closed over him in april of 1923, only a few months after the opening of the tomb, the lights of cairo extinguished with him. stranger still, at the same instant in england, s dog gave a terrifying howl and died. then georges benedite, the head of egyptian antiquities at the louvre museum
okay, let's begin. it used to be thought that the earthth was at rest and the stars went around us. and how could you tell whether or not the earth is at rest and the stars are going around us, or the stars are maybe at rest, we're going around them? in fact, what's the nearest star? begins with an s. you are now-- let me tell you. begins with a s, ends with a n, got a u in the middle, try it. sun. sun. very good, okay. that's the sun. the sun is the nearest star, okay? and we go around, around, around the sun, is that true? but it was one time thought that's not the case. and one of the arguments that was advanced to show that the earth really is at rest and not the other way around is the following: consider a bird at the top of a tree, and down below there's a juicy worm just coming up to the ground. and the bird is up at the top and looks down and sees the worm. now, we know from experience that's its possible for that bird to drop from the tree, come down, catch the worm and fly back up. true? and it was stated as such. it was calculated how fast the world would have to be mov
harder? is that so? you used to say i'm pulling harder because you see the rope moving this way. that's what you used to say. remember the old days, when you didn't have that spark called what, begin with a f. - physics. - physics, all right? and now you're getting that spark, right? and now you're starting to see the world a little differently. let's try this with a couple of scale. attach this right on here. okay, now you pull that side and we can measure the force, gang, yeah? and i'll pull over here. now you look to see who pulls harder, me on helen or helen on me? and here we go. how do the readings look, gang? huh? which one is harder? how about there? how about there? and what are they, gang? ss, same same. i can't pull on you any harder than you pull on me, okay? and when i touch you-- who's touching you? am i touching her or she touching me? she's touching my hand, i felt it. from my point of view she's touching me. from her point of view i'm touching her. who's touching who? we're touching each other. thank you, helen. my thumb, my forefinger, they're pulling on each other.
energy. we don't say motion energy, we use a greek word for motion, begins with a k. check your neighbors, see if your neighbors know it. what kind of-- what's motion energy with k? kinetic, yeah. kinetic energy, okay? and then we can talk about-- later on, we can talk about heat energy, sound energy. can anyone think of any other kinds of energy? how many said, "no, that's probably it, there's probably no more?" come on, gang, some more. light. light energy. - thermal? - tension? good, radiant energy. radiant, from radium, things like that, huh? - thermal. - good, thermal energy. good, nuclear energy. and turns out energy of being. it turns out everything has this quantity called energy. and that's given by einstein's celebrated equation. later in the course, we'll talk more about this, the idea that energy and mass are two sides, gang, of the same coin. you guys get mass, right? you know what your mass is? [makes sound] squashed up energy. you are all bits of energy all squashed up. and the more massive you are, the more energy you'll have. and sometimes you can convert from the inertia
write change in anymore. i'm gonna use a greek symbol for change in. what's the symbol, gang? - delta. - delta, that's right. so i'm gonna write that from now on as f multiplied by t equals change in. get it? delta mv. this is what we're gonna talk about today. so this delta mv, that's delta momentum. we have a name for force times time. what's the name of the force of an object multiplied by the duration of time in which that force acts? we have a name for that. it's not so common a name as this one, but see if you sit next to someone who knows what is the name of force multiplied by the time during which that force acts. go. talk it up. what is it, gang? impulse. what's the name of this? what? - impulse. - impulse. all right. impulse. okay. so we write. impulse equals change in momentum, that's what we're gonna talk about today. you wanna change the momentum of something then you have to apply an impulse. what's an impulse? that's hitting it over some time interval. down here i have a-- see that golf ball on a tee. see this golf club right here? what's the momentum of the golf ball
this distance above to that straight line is a 5 meter drop, which tells us how satellites operate. newton talked about that years ago. newton says consider a mountain high enough to be, not above gravity, a lot of people think above gravity, no, no, no, no, to be above the drag of the atmosphere. put a cannon on there and fire that cannonball and guess how fast it'll orbit. 8 kilometers per second... what you do is you orbit all the way around-- you're falling all the time, fall, fall, fall without ever hitting the ground. so that speed will put you in orbit. so next time you're watching the television set and you see they're gonna put some satellite into orbit, see the rocket go off. rocket climbing, climbing, climbing. pretty soon you'll see the rocket start to go sideways, right? should it? --better. what if just went... right back down, see? so it'll go up, gotta get up above the air drag and it's getting up, up, up and now it's gonna get level. and when it starts to get level, down below at mission control, they're pushing that thing up to guess how fast? past tense of eat, 8, okay?
? deprived childhood is-- well, most of us have looked at such things, right? let me ask you a question. how strong you suppose that ant is? strong or strong-strong? strong-strong. compared to-- for sure? compared to what? good point. let's suppose this happens, gang. an elephant walks to this door. the elephant is gonna start lifting up logs. a door over here, an ant walks through that's just as big as the elephant, a super ant. this super ant is been-- [makes sounds] --i don't know how it's been done, science fiction, okay? scaled up. and it scaled up, so, that ant-- [makes sounds] --the same size as the elephant. now, they're gonna have a contest to see who can lift a greater load. who are you gonna be betting on? elephant. ants. check your neighbor. is there anyone in here says, "honey, the ant can't even do push ups. the elephant is the one that's the strongest." show of hands. all right. these are my people. these are the people who have read the book. the rest of you guys come in for a free lunch today, right? what's that thing all about, yeah? come on. that ant couldn't make it. the
inertia and i use a capital "i". and if i put proper units in, i can call it an exact equation. so how much rotational acceleration you're gonna get something to pick up, huh? will depend upon how much torque you put on it, but how much rotational inertia does that something have. it turns out that rotational inertia is complicated. and we're just gonna get the idea of it today. rotational inertia is mr2, the mass multiplied by the distance from the rotational axis when the mass is localized. ordinarily, for different shapes, it's a more complicated equation and we won't get into that, but i can kinda show you that with this idea. here i've got a couple of plastic pipes and in these pipes, i've got some lead. and i'll tell you, the same amount of lead in each one. could i have a helper, please? my helper today gang, this is tinnie lim. she is the lady in that energy chapter who is pulling the bow and arrow back. tinnie was my student at city college in san francisco in 1980. got into conceptual physics, it spurred her on. today, she is a design engineer at jet propulsion labs in califo
product we can put in front of our kids, it makes us very happy. >> so now each school day, bright and early, the revolution is beginning at the rev food headquarters in alameda, and in a converted mcdonald's of all places. but now instead of fast food, kids are being introduced to entrees that are fast, healthy, and good for them. here, all the food is prepared fresh daily--nothing fried, processed, or reheated. from there, workers then deliver the lavish lunches to schools all across the bay area and in los angeles, as well. >> every single lunch and breakfast has a piece of-- a serving of whole fruit. and most of our snacks come with a serving of whole fruit. and if they don't come with that, they come with a serving of fresh vegetables. >> to help with their new food revolution, the ladies built key partnerships with whole foods, clover stornetta, and diestel turkeys. as well, the three began sourcing from local farmers throughout the bay area, like torrey olson of gabriel farms in sebastopol. gabriel farm is a 14-acre organic farm located in the ideal fruit-growing climate of
: many of us, especially those who work with infants, are the child's and the parents' first real contact with the outside world. this presents us with a unique opportunity for becoming closely involved and attached to our infants and family members. hi. hi. but how do we form a bond with our children without becoming overly attached? where do we begin? we can start by making sure the lines of communication between ourselves and the family members are wide open. he has not eaten this morning. he was a good little boy, even though his sister woke him up. sissy wake you up? yes, she did. did sissy wake you up this morning? he's probably hungry. are you hungry? hendrick: one way is by looking for opportunities to find out what's happening at home. families are under a great deal of stress these days for any number of reasons. they might regret having to leave their child with someone else and feel guilty about it. also, many families with young children are under stress as they try to balance the demands of work and family. there are ways we can keep in touch with families. first, we need to
in san francisco. >> we like direct marketing because it gives us more control over how your product is being presented. >> does this come from japan? >> no. this is grown in california. we've been growing rice in california since the 1920s. we're extremely happy to see brown rice being used in innovative presentations. >> applications like they do at the m cafe in southern california. based on a purely macrobiotic diet, which is one where everything is eaten in balance, and eggs, dairy, sugar, and meat are eaten in moderation, the restaurant is packing them in faster than they can wrap together the hundreds of sushi rolls they prepare daily. up to 40% of their cuisine here is based strictly on koda farms rice. everything from sushi to rice bowls to rice pudding to even their famous big macro veggie burger. >> we're japanese. rice is a huge part of it. because that is our main food we consume every day. and we have researched a lot of different organic rice. and this koda farm rice is absolutely amazing. that's all we use. this is the only brand that i know that's organic and heirloo
sellers. you know, one of the most special parts about being a farmer is seeing how chefs use your produce. and on the central coast, we saw one very special connection between a farmer and a chef. along the central coast, they're blessed with picture-perfect postcard weather, breathtaking scenery, and a variety of agriculture, all of which have contributed to the success of gold coast farms >> well, the family farm operation gold coast gas started by my father ron burk and his partner bob espinola. and they started farming in 1978. and they started framing with lettuce and broccoli. and that evolved into spinach and cilantro, cauliflower, strawberries. we do a few specialty items like the grapes and scme sweet corn and pumpns, things like that in the summer. but the bulk of what we do is broccoli, cilantro, spinach , cauliflower. >> today gary and his dad ron run the farm that remains as diversified as ever. they grow a variety of crops, including a couple hundred acres of spinach in santa maria that goes to restaurants and grocery stores across the country. they also grow more than a tho
congress for funding. moran borrowed $500 from the publisher of ribner's, using his painting "children of the mountain" as collateral. he obtained an additnal $500 and a letter of introduction from jay cooke, a prominent philadelphia financier and a principal investor in the northern pacific railroad. in july of 1871, moran traveled by train to utah, where just two years earlier, the union pacific and thecel pd to form the first transcontinental railway. he joined hayden's party in montana. they proceeded to fort ellis and soon entered the fabled region of yellowstone. moran worked closely with the expedition photographer, william henry jackson. together they selected the most impressive views. moran made drawings and watercolor sketches, blocking in forms d contours, quickly noting the colors of the terrain and the sulfurous deposits for which yellowstone is named. back in newark, new jersey, moran began what he termed his "big picture," "the grand canyon of the yellowstone." for moran, the spiritual, natural and aesthetic realms should blend to create a great impression. to that end,
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